When Did Cool Become a Currency?

Bella Hadid, Cool

Cool has become a spending power.

Or more over, a selling power. With the rise of Instagram advertising and #spon posts, cool has never been more popular. 

Or more expensive.

There has always been a seductive allure around looking good; looking cool. It's a recognised level of social status from us all - the ultimate effortless effort in one's appearance. 

 

Currently, cool centres around Man Repeller adored frilly, boxy and oversized shirts. Ranging from bright magenta pink to office whites and blue; pinstriped, embroidered with snatches of phrases (H&M currently has one with 'Girls Bite Back' in red on the cuffs). Blouses with ruffle cuffs and deconstructed openings, slashed down to the collarbone and exposing your décollectage.  Colours revolving around primarily millennial pink and bright yellow, which I must mention of Topshop finally introducing a pink suit. The shade? It's millennial pink, of course and it looks delightful. Contrast summer looks with vintage blue levi's and red sling back heels, because pops of colour have never looked so good. See Pandora Sykes' report for more; right here.

Slouchy, awkward length Topshop culottes and mules in every colour of the rainbow. Oversized earrings made with threads and plastic jewels, the type of costume jewellery we were all rolling our eyes at ten years ago. But God, they're just so cool right now, right?

Cool is...

The teeny square sunglasses like Bella Hadid has been recently wearing, or Kaia Gerber (Cindy Crawford’s daughter, yes in those Marc Jacobs beauty ads). The new age of models have cool down to pat. An example best loved by fashion bloggers is Elsa Hosk; baker boy hats perched on top of natural tousled hair, wide leg jeans and 70's style denim like those seen on the Marc Jacobs runway, ready-to-wear catwalk looks right down to the dainty strappy sandals.

European holiday has never been more in. Look to Lucy Williams at www.fashionmenow.co.uk for more, as Lucy does it sp well. The style I'm talking about? That’s beach hair and Parisian dresses, the type frequently seen on Jeanne Damas, best showcased by her company Rouje. Cool is espadrille sandals with ribbon ties wrapped around ankles and trailing up calves.

Topshop, colour blocking, cool

But it's also...

London girl sports luxe; denim skirts with fishnet tights, bleached hair and pastel coloured hair best done at Bleach London. Mascara done thick, ideal for spider lashes by breaching the regulations of natural shades, hues of pink or blue are more fondly used as seen on Adwoa Aboah at the Gurls Talk event in London. 90’s reinvention trainers (God I hope the 90's stick around in style) like the Reebok classic instead of sling backs, but in canvas tote bags you may find them if they feel so inclinded, because a woman can be prepared and look cool. In addition to this, summer cool means linen print trousers, millennial pink jeans or in soft lilacs as seen in Urban Outfitters. The cool that somehow morphs into New York/Brooklyn cool, maybe it’s the art scene, maybe it’s the lifestyle and the liberal values, who knows?

But what’s most noticed by the Currency Of Cool is that it's now viewed as different forms and different manners. We no longer have as rigid a ‘one size fits all’ (haven’t you seen the rise of plus-size models and roar of diversity rising on the catwalk? Isn't it SO thrilling!). Cool can be anything and everything, because what makes cool is usually the way the person looks all together. Millenials and those in generation Z are pushing the boundaries, being more open with their lifestyles than the Boomers before. And gender fluid dressing, as male MUA’S rise further in popularity, I hear you say?

Well anybody who’s anybody knows it isn’t a straight couple on the cover of American Vogue wearing the same suit.

 

That? That just doesn’t sell.

Lou x

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